Preparing your own pumpkin for beer brew day

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Each pumpkin will give you lots and lots of seeds, more than you will ever need.

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Pumpkin Ale – is a special type of beer, highly in demand, for the good stuff!

The best fastest way is to buy canned pumpkin and then use that in the beer recipe to brew your beer to learn, but if you want to do it the right way, the proper way is to use fresh pumpkin and then baking it to get the pumpkin meat prepared for the brewing session.

Nothing beats a fresh 100% organic pumpkin grown in your back yard and it is fairly easy to do as well!

There are many web sites that will give you a good idea of how to prepare the pumpkin and then how to bake it in the oven, here are the steps:

  1. clean the pumpkin well with warm water
  2. cut the pumpkin in half and remove all the seeds in the middle with a sharp good knife
  3. save the seeds for next year, each pumpkin will give you many of seeds
  4. add some water into a bake dish 1/4 ” and place pumpkin there, cut face down
  5. bake in oven at 350 F for about 40 – 45 minutes until soft, like a potato (poke check)
  6. remove and let cool down
  7. peel the outer skin, cut into chunks, place into plastic bags (suck out oxygen) and freeze

some more pictures (after baking is over):

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Let the bag cool before putting into freezer!

Cheers!

 

Beer Hops growing from start to finish, with pictures…

This short post shows with lots of pictures the progression of growing a hop plant, harvesting hops and drying them out.

Remember!!! – Hops are deadly to Dogs, so keep them away from your pets at all times, through all phases of dealing with them once you pick them off the plants, and even while on plants, isolate them with some fencing, just to be on the safe side.

Also, you probably won’t get much if any hops the first year after planting from root, the first year is all about the plant establishing it self (this is normal).  If you plant a hop plant from a plant (not a root) early enough in the season, you might get some hops the first year.

Hops peaking out from a fresh root.

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Hops growing up and climbing the trellis (made from cow fencing) on it’s side.

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Hop plants climbing the top of the trellis and transitioning to a grow rope.

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Hops are starting to flower, buds are visible.

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Buds are almost mature and ready for Harvest.

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Dried hops after harvest.

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Bottom of the dry box, loose yellow lupulin clearly visible.

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For more information on Hops see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hops

Also, this is a really good resource with lots of details and identifying pictures to help you id which hops you might have, if you don’t know:

http://www.usahops.org/userfiles/file/HGA%20BCI%20Reports/HGA%20Variety%20Manual%20-%20English%20%28updated%20March%202011%29.pdf

Thanks for reading and Cheers!