Apricot Belgian Blonde 10 Gallon Recipe // All Grain

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brew-day: 12/26/2015 // OG – 1.072 // Update on temp. chart of fermentation later along with FG, we are hoping for 8%.  This recipe originally called for 3lb of sugar, we used 1.5lb.  If you want 9%, add that extra sugar.

For yeast using a 2000ml starter, French Saison #3711 prepared 28 hours ahead of time.  The best thing to do with starters if you really want to be exact about it, is to test the wort until it reaches an OG of approx. 1.040.  This will prepare and propagate the yeast for the main fermentation without tiring its self out before the main fight.  The best way to do that is with a refractometer (make sure to buy one with the SG wort scale for brix %).

sugar + yeast = alcohol, Co2 and heat.

Fermentation is an exothermic process. The internal temperature of the fermentor can be as much as 10F above ambient conditions on the outside, just due to yeast activity.

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70 minute boil.

Malt:

  • 24 lbs of American 2-row (use local grain from your state/region if you can, support your local farmers)
  • 1.2 lb aromatic malt
  • 1.5lb cane sugar – [ in Belgian beers sugar is added to lighten the body of the beer without affecting the taste, it will also increase the ABV as it should fully convert.  Warning: Belgian beers are not Budweiser. drink them responsibly and slow… ]

Hops:

  • 10 minute into the boil (70 mins total), add 2 ounce of Magnum Hops – for Bitter
  • at end of boil, add 2 ounce of Styrian Hops – for Aroma

We always add Irish Moss at 15 minute to end of boil

Yeast:

We used a French Saison #3711 // but there are other choices not limited to: Abbey Ale or Wyeast 3787 (Trappist High Gravity) yeast (we recommend you make a starter atleast 24 hours bore brew day).

Fermentation:

Add 2 days into the fermentation the Apricot Puree, 5-6 lbs.  Fruit doesn’t transfer well in boil, otherwise skip if you don’t want the Apricots.

Belgian Stout All Grain Recipe

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September 11th, 2016 Brew: ( 10 gallon batch )…

OG 1.080 // Sep 11, 2016

FG 1.012 // Sep 24, 2016

Fermentation took a solid week.  ABV 8.9% // SRM 25

90 Minutes Mash at around 148F, followed by a 45 minutes at 158F, then mash-out at 170F // what we did different this time, used more grain and no Belgian Candi was used.  Also, the 2 lb of Caramel 40L was split into 1 lb 40 and 60 Caramel each.

grain schedule (cost of grain bill was $47 from a brew store

  • Pale 2-row 27.50 lb
  • Torrified Wheat 1 lb
  • Chocolate Malt 350L 1.5 lb
  • Caramel 40 Love 1 lb
  • Caramel 60 Love 1 lb

hops schedule (whole hops cost was free, since we grew our own hops // pellet we buy it by the pound, this way cost averages down by ounce )

  • 1.5 oz of whole hops Cascades, at start of boil
  • 1 oz of pellet hops, Cascades at 30 minutes
  • 1 oz of pellet hops, Cascades at 45 minutes + Irish Moss

yeast (we maintain our own, so this is almost free)

The yeast was the 1214 Belgian Abbey from 2014 brew which was sitting in the fridge all this time; we made a starter, and like a Boss!  2 liter starter, 48 hours.

 

 

 

December, 2014 Brew below:

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Mash schedule:

90 minutes at 142F, than raise temps to 158F and hold for an additional 45 minutes, Mash out.

Over Ratio Grains Recipe:

  • 80% pale 2-row
  • 5% torrefied wheat
  • 5% Belgian Chocolate mail
  • 10% Caramel Malt (40L)
  • 1lb of Belgian Dark Sugar Syrup

Hops schedule for a 5 gallon batch:

  • 1 oz at start of boil – Willamette
  • 1 oz at 30 minutes – East Kent
  • 1 oz at end of boil – East Kent

for this recipe however we used Cascade hops for the whole thing, because we have a lot of them from the 2014 Harvest :- ) and also, these were the exact grains that we used, sometimes you have to substitute based on what is available where you live, you can also order exact grains and have them delivered, probably costs more money…

For the 10 gallon batch, we used:

  • 24 pounds of Golden Promise – which is a pale 2-row malt
  • 3 pounds of Crystal Malt, 40 Lov. (40L)
  • 1.5 pounds of British Chocolate Malt (450-500 L)
  • 1.50 pounds torrified wheat malt – it increases head retention and body / version of flaked wheat
  • 1 LB of Dark Brown Candi Sugar
  • 1 LB of Dark Belgian Candy Syrup
  • double the hot schedule for a 10 gallon batch ( see above )

We used 1214 Belgian Abbey yeast on this one!

12/21/2014 Brew OG 1.082

Videos:

mashing stage with re-circulation:

boil stage:

fermentation stage:

 

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Ferment for 2 ~ 3 weeks at about 70F, read your yeast specs…

Yeast – many different type of Belgian yeasts exists, please do your research…

Achouffe — Wyeast 3522 (Belgian Ardennes) and White Labs WLP550 (Belgian Ale)

Chimay — Wyeast 1214 (Belgian Ale) and White Labs WLP500 (Trappist Ale)

Du Bocq (Corsendonk) — Wyeast 3538 (Leuven Pale Ale)

Duvel Moortgat — Wyeast1388 (Belgian Strong Ale) and White Labs WLP570 (Belgian Golden Ale)

Rochefort — Wyeast 1762 (Belgian Abbey II) and White Labs WLP540 (Belgian Abbey IV)

Orval — White Labs WLP510 (Bastogne Belgain Ale)

Unibroue — Wyeast 3864 (Cana-dian/Belgian)

Westmalle — Wyeast 3787 (Trappist High Gravity) and White Labs WLP530 (Abbey Ale)

 

Belgian/French Saison aka Farmhouse Ale Recipe +Fruit – All Grain

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Last Brew Date:

7/28/2015 – on Sunday we are brewing a slightly different variation this year.  80% Pilsner, 10% Vienna, 10% Wheat.  Columbus for bittering and Saaz for Aroma hops // using French Saison Yeast #3711 by Wyeast.  In addition we will use Raspberries during secondary conditioning for a – French Raspberry Saison…  Also we will shoot for at least a Double, so approx. 9% ABV+.  The colour we are looking for is a farmhouse straw!

The two pics below were a test pour out of the Fermentor at 2 weeks, the classic staw Farmhouse Ale colour was spot on.  The beer tasted awesome as well, only will get much better with time.

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Raspberries also come through the best in beers for the flavor, taste and their overall profile.  It can turn some beer slightly sour with an unexpected benefit!

OG this time was 1.068…  FG was 7 days later (1 week fermentation), for a final of 1.005 – which would put this beer at a approximate 8.30% // not too shabby!

Now to Age // CHEERS!

Here is how the beer looks like at mashout…

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and here is how it looks like after 1 week of fermentation with the raspberries added to the fermentor at day 3.

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Raspberry-Fruit-Wallpaper

7/20/2014 – we used 12 pounds of grain (per recipe percentage proportions), and 1/2 lb of Belgian Candi sugar (that’s all we had left)..  OG – 1.049, FG – 1.009

ABV % – 5.25%

Belgian Saison Ale

Historically a Saison is a french style farm beer, brewed in Fall/Winter for the next season – a harvesting/farmer drink.  These days many variations exist, and many good articles too – Google for additional research and ask questions if you are not sure about something.

If you want a traditional Saison don’t add any spices or orange/lemon peels and use traditional German hops like the Noble or something regional from the French area – since this is a traditional French beer.  We also like East Kent (even tho they are from the UK) and Styrian – these add a sweet edge to the beer.

Traditional Sainson’s are bottle conditioned and highly carbonated.  Color can be Golden to Amber, ABV 3 ~ 5%, modern Sainson can be as high as 6.5%+.  Should be moderately hoped to balance out the maltiness for all ABV variations.

Age: 1 ~ 2 months, and up to a year+

60 minute standard mash, some people even do a 90 minute mash

We will post out ( OG , FG ) and final ABV later.

  • 85% lbs domestic Pilsner // we like to use the German Pilsner Malt as substitution.
  • 10% Wheat
  • 5% Euro Caravienne

Hops / Additional ingredients:

Once you achieve a rolling boil, set timer:

  • At start-of-boil add 1.5 oz of Styrian Golding Hops and 1 lb of Light Belgian Candi
  • At 45 minute of boil add some Irish Moss – helps with Chill Haze later – http://byo.com/stories/item/486-conquer-chill-haze
  • At 5 minutes end-of-boil, add 1 oz of Sweet Orange Peel or lemon peels – depends what you want – ( skip peels for a traditional Seison )
  • At 2 minutes end-of-boil, add 1 oz of Noble Hops

Yeast:

Wheast #3711 seems highly recommended by other brewers, Wheast #3724 was reported to be slow and a pain-in-the-ass.  Yeasts by White Labs was recommended, choose a proper yeast for a true Saison beer.

Belgian Abbey Ale – 5/10 + gallon batch

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Above picture was taken on a frosty November morning 11/23/2013.

Belgian beer in general needs to be aged properly for longer than your average, we recommend at least a good 3 months, you will noticed the beer get considerably better over time.

Belgian Abbey Ale – 5+ gallon batch (means you might end up with a little bit more than 5 gallons).

A darker and stronger Belgian beer, if you like a beer with a little kick, but one that still tastes great, this is it!

ABV 9~ 11% (depends on your brew setup/equipment/efficiencies and experience)

Standard mash at 152~154F for 60 minutes, boil for an additional 60 minutes, ferment below 70F.

Grain:

14 lb American 2-Row Malt
1 lb Munich Malt
2 oz. Chocolate Malt

Hops:

1 oz. Willamette @ 15 minutes (from start of boil)
1 oz. Willamette @ 60 minutes (at end of boil)

Use your house Belgian yeast or try: White Labs Belgian Ale (WLP550) or Abbey Ale (WLP530).

Note, we usually brew the 10 gallon version of this beer.. If you want a darker beer, double your Chocolate Malt, keep in mind that you are adding this using ounces (not pounds) unlike the other malt grains.  We usually add 4 ounces for a 10 gallon batch, double the mentioned amount for the 5 gallon batch, here is a video of a Re-circulation of the Belgian Abbey, so you can get an idea of its color….

Additional Tips:  Anytime you are brewing bigger batches, 10+ you need to be on the look out for stuck sparges, once the channel gets stuck in the sparging process, the beer will stop want to flow out of the mash tun.   You can heat to 168 F, this will most likely unstuck it by reducing the viscosity of your wort, however be careful – too high of a temperature anything past 170F and extraction of unwanted tannins will happen.

Anyways with a few batches you will figure it out :- )

10 Gallon batch:

28 lb American 2-Row Malt
2 lb Munich Malt
4 oz. Chocolate Malt

Hops:

2 oz. Willamette @ 15 minutes (from start of boil)
2 oz. Willamette @ 60 minutes (at end of boil)

Here we actually used a little bit more water then intended and added also 1/2 lb of Belgian candi sugar – ended up with a OG of 1.058 (border line 1.060) and we actually ended up with about 15 gallons of beer, not 10 – LOL

FG was 1.013 – final alcohol ABV:  5.91% or 6% rounded ( keep in mind that we used the grain amount for a 10 gallon batch in a 15 gallon batch, so the ABV was diluted, to make it less strong )..

Yes – 15 gallons is heavy, you will need a pump to help you transfer the beer, unless you have a 3 stage all gravity system in place, good luck and cheers!

 

 

Belgian Pale Ale – 5 gallon batch

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A lighter Belgian beer, similar to a English Ale – with a medium copper color.

Not overly hoppy or malty.

Brewed on 4/7/2013 – OG was 1.059

Kegged Beer on 4/14/2013 – FG was 1.015

ABV% 5.78%

Standard mash at 152F for 30 minutes, boil for 60 minutes, ferment below 70F.

ABV / Alcohol by Volume: 5~6% +/- ( depends on the efficient of your brew equipment and your brew skills )

  • 12 lb Euroean Pale
  • 1 lb 2-row malt
  • 1 lb Victory malt
  • 1 lb Cara Munich malt
  • 1/2 lb of light sugar or honey or brown sugar – ( end of boil ), we used brown sugar
  • 1 3/4 oz Kent Golding hops – [ 1 oz at 20 minutes and 3/4 at 60 minutes ]
  • 1 1/2 oz Saaz hops – [ 1 oz at 10 minutes and 1/2 at 15 minutes ]

Use your house Belgian yeast or try: White Labs Belgian Ale (WLP550) or Abbey Ale (WLP530).

We ramp up slowly the yeast temperature starting at low 60s in the fermentor for metabolism reasons, so that the beers attenuation is not affected.

… more information will be posted later with OG, FG, thanks!

Belgian White Ale – All Grain Recipe – 10 Gallons All Grain

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 Dude, its like drinking WOW in your mouth!

( the picture above was of only a 3 week old test pour out of Keg that was cold dropped only for overnight, that’s less than 24 hours!!! – makes HUGE difference! ), beer only gets better with time!

OG 1.048 +/-
FG 1.010 +/-

We use a converted Keg into a Mashtun with a false-bottom, see pictures…  Our efficiency currently varies between 75-80%, sometimes higher.

ABV / Alcohol by Volume: 5% (rounded off)

  • 9.5 lbs Belgian Pilsner (2-row), brew store might sell it under Euro Pilsner Malt.
  • 6 lbs White Wheat Malt, brew store might sell it under American Wheat Malt.
  • 5 lbs Flaked Wheat
  • 2 oz Cascade Hops – [ 1 oz at 5 minutes and one at 30 minutes ]
  • 1 oz Orange Peel, might be sold under Bitter Orange Peel – [ 15 minutes of boil ]
  • 1 oz Coriander Seed, (crush it – store might sell it un-crushed in a plastic bag) – [ 15 minutes of boil ]

Yeast Starter was used ahead of brew day.

Total boil time is 50 minutes, if you want to do 60 minutes, the World won’t end.  Primary ferment for a week+ or until reaction finishes, Secondary recommended; but not manditory.

For yeast we used a Wyeast 3787 re-captured Trappist HG (high gravity) yeast, but the original recipe called for a White Labs# WLP40 Wit Ale.  BTW: It’s ok to use (HG high-gravity) yeast on a (LG lower-gravity) beers, but not the other way around.

8.5 gallons of strike water at 163F, maintain for an hour (60 minutes) at 152F

Then Re-Mash 6.5 gallons of additional water for 30 minutes more at 168-172, we simply filled the mash tun with 6 gallons of additional water, stir it so often and drain it off at 30 minutes, the rest gets cooled and fed to horses and chickens.  Horses especially love the mash left overs, its like Candy to them and the chickens go nuts and lay later high quality eggs.

So total water for brew 15 gallons (mash + re-mash).

For fermentation we used a 15.5 gallon keg that was converted into a fermentor rather than splitting it into multiple glass carboys or some other method.

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After fermentation is done, we split into 2 soda kegs and carbonate.

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Noble Trappist Ale (Belgian) – All Grain Recipe

Noble Trappist Ale (Belgian), 5.3% Alcohol, OG 1.053, Avg IBU 37 [time to ready 2 months] – use 1.25 quarts per lb of grain for Mash, then 1/2 gallon per pound of grain for the Sparge.

Total boil after mashing – 1 hour.

  • 9 lbs domestic 2 row (grain)
  • 8 oz Caramel 40 (grain)
  • 8 oz Carapils
  • 2 oz Hallertau hops – add at start of boil
  • 1 oz Styrian Golding hops – last 2 minutes of boil
  • Additional items: 1 lb Light Belgian Candi
  • ( dry yeast or liquid yeasts: Wyeast German Ale, White Labs German Ale or German Ale)