London Stout

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8/31/2019

10-gallon primary batch sparge

  • 18 lb 2-row Northwest Pale
  • 1.5 lb Crystal 60
  • 1 lb Chocolate malt 350 love
  • 1.5 lb roasted barley 300 love

Hops:

  • 1.0 whole hops Yakima – start of boil
  • 1.5 ounce Norther Brewer hops – start of boil
  • 1.5 ounce Fuggles last 10 minutes of boil

Yeast – reusing the previous yeast brewed in the London Brown a few months back, doing a starter / London Ale III – Wyeast 1318 yeas

75-minute boil on the primary batch… OG 1.062 / 1 month fermentation FG 1.014 – 6.3% final OG

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5-gallon secondary batch – here we use 6 gallons of water, added 2 ounces of whole hops into the grain (false bottom will prevent whole hop clog), bring to boil and do a short 30 minute boil, adding hops at a reduced time ratio. We also added (1lb dry light dry malt extract dme) to help with OG.

Hops:

  • 2.0 whole hops Yakima – start of boil
  • 0.5 ounce Norther Brewer hops – start of boil
  • 0.5 ounce Fuggles last 10 minutes of boil

30 minute boil. You might still get a stuck mash, so mashing out at a higher temp helps – I used a strong pump to suck and get it flowing, cool down the temps while recirculating (if no pump), good luck.

Here is how the secondary batch looks like after 3 weeks of fermentation and a quick co2 charge, it tastes light and is very easy to drink, creamy head with a chocolate taste, pretty damn good beer. The beer is at about 4.5%

London Brown Ale 10 + 5 gallon batch

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this beer came out delicious! – slightly on the sweet side with a hint of a hop after taste…

Today I am brewing a Brown London Ale using Wyeast 1318 yeast, which is a “London Ale III”.

Here I will do my standard 10 gallon batch sparge, but also do a 2nd running on the (same grain) and brew a secondary 5 gallon batch. I’ve done this before and you basically get 50% more beer with the same grain bill, just a bit weaker beer.

For this I always like to start with a high-er gravity beer, like 6% or higher, and then this way your secondary will end up around 5%+

In your secondary, you do have an option to add more DME or like in this case, we added 1/2 pound of Dark Brown Sugar. In the second batch you have the freedom if you want to use a totally different hop profile or even yeast. Of course you can keep everything the same, like I did.

malt:

primary 10-gallon grail bill:

  • 18 lbs Golden Promise
  • 5 lbs Munich Malt
  • 1.5 lbs Crystal 15
  • 1.5 lbs Crystal 60
  • 0.60 lbs Chocolote malt, 200 Love
  • 0.50 lbs Dark Brown Sugar

secondary running – same grain on a 5 gallon batch, plus 0.50 Dark Brown Sugar.

hops:

10 gallon – batch 1.5 ounce Cascade whole hops on 10 gallons from start of boil and 1 ounce of Willametter at 15 end of boil

5 gallon 2nd running – exactly the same

yeast:

London Ale III – Wyeast 1318 yeas

On the 2nd running I will use 6 gallon of water, re-heat it only and then transfer out of mash tun to the boil to finish it off, with standard 1 hour boil.

OG on 10 gallon – 1.06 – about 6% + – this one fermented for only about a week, and it comes out nice and sweet, I bet if you let it go longer it will end up higher ABV and less sweet, if you like this.

OG on 5 gallon – 1.04 – FG was 1.004 but also I left it in the fermentor for over a month, it comes out nice and clear and lighter color, more like a Newcastle Brown (also way better), so this comes out at a surprising 4.7% – so basically a 5% beer – see pic below:

Some nice outcomes from the secondary running is that the grain had more time to cook, so it is a little more of a roasty/nutty flavor, and in a English Brown Ale that is not a bad idea.

Wild Blonde Ale

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About 5 weeks ago we brewed a Blonde Ale / here I wanted to experiment more with the wild yeast culture that I have collected from raspberries in summer of 2018. This is my second attempt, the first was brewing a low ABV beer, but even here I think letting it ferment for more than the original 1 week would have been better. I finished fermenting in the bottles, so I am glad I didn’t use too much priming sugar.

below pic of the Krausen, some of it was saved…

It seems very important to monitor the activity and make sure it is done, especially if you are going to use priming sugar in your bottles so that they don’t over pressurize and become little time bombs.

The culture works, but incrementally over time, for this test I didn’t do any temperature tests, just keeping the Beeruino set at minimum 68F, since the basement can get cold sometimes – but right now I don’t know if it performs better at higher temps like 75F or 80 ~ 90F or some other range.

I took a weekly sample using a hydrometer and its flask.

The OG (original gravity) was 1.059 on this Blonde Ale.

1 week later1.04
2 weeks later1.03
3 weeks later1.022
4 weeks later1.014
5 weeks later1.010
6 weeks later1.008

Looks like at about 1.010 the fermentation stabilized and ABV is about 6.7% / probably in the end closer to 7%

I would monitor the flask as it basically is a mini-fermentor, but would still take a weekly sample from the fermentor, it was pretty much spot on – so one should be able to just take one sample with a hydrometer and monitor the flask (save beer), cover it with tinfoil or something like that seems to work awesome for me.

Wild Farmhouse Ale

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some warning – this was my first time collecting wild yeast and fermenting using it, there is a lot more to wild yeasts than meets the eye and more than I wrote in this blog, I am aware of it – but this is more of a story than anything. If you decide to go down the adventure road of wild yeast, just be careful and use common sense – research everything, this is by no means some indefinite write-up, also – stay away from assholes, they are everywhere, enjoy the hobby and don’t let them bog you down!

by the way: if you are interested in purchasing the Wild Yeast that was used to make this beer – Contact me.

When the Norwegian Farmhouse Ale was brewed – I did a second water running on the grain (lower ABV 3%) to test out a wild yeast that was collected in Summer of 2018 off Raspberries.

Now to those that don’t know a wild yeast is not a pure strain of yeast, it is in fact a culture – which is a mix of yeast, maybe even more than one yeast and other bacteria. When I first captured the yeast after the initial fermentation there was Brettanomyces in the krausen- this gives you the sour beer, in the top of the krausen you can see a spider web like infection – this is a tell tale sign.

I didn’t want a sour beer, so I had to clean it up, I collected the yeast below the krausen and did another yeast starter – you can google about this process to learn more…

see video below of what I did:

After another fermentation and confirmation of a clean yeast, I stored in the fridge until I had an opportunity to use it later, which was on this brew. Wild yeast in my opinion are a lot tougher, they have to survive winter in some harsh conditions, nature maintains it without any human involvement or lab process, in piles under leaves, under snow, sometimes freezing for months. I think it gives to the complexity and variability of the beer and probably why there is a resurgence in the Wild Ales.

So anyways, this yeast was added to the wort from the second runnings, pics below, as you can see the Brettanomyces is gone!!!

Yes, I collected all of that krausen into a sterilized jar and into the fridge it went for another brew. As you can see it was very clean and I didn’t see any weird colors or blocks of anything odd.

So now I have my very own unique wild culture of yeast collected from my land 🙂 Hooray!

another warning when bottling – let the ABV settle for a while to make sure it is stable and use less than the idea amount of priming sugar your first time as with a non-wild yeast, so you don’t end up with exploding bottles, as example I used 3 ounces of sugar for this 5 gallons batch, and everything ended up fine for me and nice…

I will brew some other beers in the future and blog more later…

I will update once the beer is ready to drink with more pics and a more detailed taste report!

links:

If you are into Sour beers:

Kviek Norwegian Farmhouse Ale

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10 gallon batch.

Today 1/6/2019 we brewed a Norwegian Farmhouse Ale – but not using any traditional means, just a farmhouse grain stack with yeast – Imperial Yeast A43 Loki.

I will brew this again in the future using the Juniper branches in the more traditional way, but for now – we will go with a more modern recipe.

Speaking with the brew store employee, he just brewed something like that with the Loki yeast and recommended fermenting at 90F – so we used the Beeruino to control temperature at 90F and Log the fermentation (plot posted later).

We employed a step mash starting at 141 F for 90 minutes and slowly moving to target temp of 153F using a recirculating pump and a PID electric heater setup. This is a linear process but one way up, you never want to start at a too high of a temperature, as it would denature the enzymes and poop your beer.

grains:

  • 21 lb Belgian Pilsner
  • 1 lb Skagit Vienna (locally sourced grain)
  • 1 lb Munich
  • 1 lb Caramunich 60 Love
  • 1 lb flaked Oakts – fyi: we put it into the mash from the start, but if you don’t have a good strong pump that can pull, you might get a stuck mash starting at a lower temp like we did at 141 F – you can add it towards the end of the mash once your temperatures are higher…

R Code below… with Plot.

temp = c(141,147,151,153,153,153,153)

time = c(0,15,30,45,60,75,90)

?plot

plot(time,temp, type =”o”)

hops:

  • 2 ounces of UK Golding Hops – start of boil
  • 1 ounce Styrian – 5 minutes to end of boil

yeast:

Imperial Yeast Loki A43

More Update later – including looking into the more traditional brew.

Links to some YouTube traditional brews: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=norwegian+farmhouse+ale

OG was 1.046, FG ended up at 1.010 – 4.7%

but wait there is more… 🙂

We added back 6 gallons of water into the spent grant and kept going for a 2nd running, this is something new that I decided to do, the beer will be lower ABV, but I was ok with that.

For this one I have the freedom to use different hops, used 2 ounces of whole hops of 50/50 mix (Chinook, Cascade #homegrown) at start of boil and 70 grams of Saaz at 5 minutes to end of boil, shooting for a 5 gallon batch on this – so more hops here…

And for the yeast I used a Wild yeast that I have collected in the summer time off of raspberries, so this will not be a Norwegian Farmhouse, but more like a Wild Raspberries Farmhouse – just a creation that I’ve decided last minute and geek out on this brew day!

I named the wild yeast culture RAYRAS 01 – collected in August 2018. It looked good and smelled really good of fruit esters when a test was done, so we will see if this is any good or maybe I will get a surprise and get some nice wild sour, bottom line I expect an efficient yeast even with a 2nd running, it might end up close to the first because of the efficiencies of the yeast. TBD…

This yeast is not pure yet, it is a culture – meaning a mix of yeast and other things…

The Wild Farmhouse Ale – came out great so far, ABV was low 3% because I ran the water on the 2nd runnings – you could mix in some DME to bump that up, I didn’t on this test, as I wasn’t sure if the yeast would work out and it did!

Pictures tell a thousand words:

This is the yeast that was added in, collected from Raspberries, that’s why the color in the sample.

The wild yeast culture overall looked good at the end, no infections, no funky smells, taste tested good and within acceptable normal. I’ve collecting it to keep for the next batch.

American Brown Ale 10 gallon batch

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attempt #1 pic below – Brew date: 3/26/1016

american_brown_ale-attempt1

attempt #2 pic below – Brew date: 7/10/2016

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10 gallons.

This beer was modeled after the Diamond Knot Brown Ale per the grains/hops posted on their web site, and simulated for ABV/SRM and IBU using app “Wort Pro”.

http://www.diamondknot.com/the-beer/always-on/brown-ale/

Videos of the brew are below:

adding flaked oats to mash: – add sweetness and body – read…

start of boil (using hop balls for whole hops so they don’t plug up the pipes):

transfer to fermentor:

adding yeast:

next day fermenting:

Attempt #1 – OG 1.068 // FG 1.010 – final ABV 7.6% – yes a little higher then the 6.0% Diamond Knot..

  • IBU 25.8
  • SRM 13

Attempt #2 – OG 1.066 // FG 1.014 – final ABV 6.83%

  • IBU 28.3
  • SRM 13

Total water used 15.5 gallons for final 10 gallons of beer…

attempt #1 grains:

  • 18 lb Pale Malt 2-row
  • 4.5 lb Munich Malt 10 love
  • 3.0 lb Crystal Malt 10 love – see below for attempt #2 changes
  • 0.20 lb Chocolate Malt
  • 0.20 lb Black Barley
  • 1.0 lb flaked Barley
  • 1/2 lb of brown sugar

attempt #2 grains:

  • 18 lb Pale Malt 2-row
  • 4.5 lb Munich Malt 10 love
  • 1.5 lb Crystal Malt 15 love
  • 1.5 lb Crystal Malt 60 love – we did this to give the beer more caramel flavor and beer body
  • 0.40 lb Chocolate Malt – we double the dark grains to darken the color a bit
  • 0.40 lb Black Barley
  • 1.0 lb flaked Barley
  • 1/2 lb of brown sugar – we didn’t use it this time, the sugar…

hops attempt #1:

  • 2.0 oz Galena with some whole hops from last year’s harvest (Yakima & Cascade) at start of boil, added to the hop boil ball, see video.
  • 2.0 oz Willamette last 15 minute of boil.

hops attempt #2:

  • 2.0 oz of home grown Cascade Hops, 2015 harvest (beginning of boil)
  • 1.0 oz of Cascade pallet + 1.0 oz Willamette pallet (last 15 minutes)

attempt #1 – Wyeast #1056 yeast was used, took 2 weeks to ferment out, this yeast consistently bubbled over the 2 week period…

attempt #2 – British Ale Wyeast #1098 // 2 liter starter // 1.040 gravity – majority of the active fermentation will be over in about 4 days, but let it go out full 2 weeks – because it’s still happening, just slower, also we like to allow extra time for all the floaters in the fermentor to settle.  On that note, per one of our brew nerds – once fermentation is over, trapped dissolved co2 gas slowly escapes the beer, so it will give you a false sense of a fermenation – only way is to measure.

attempt #3 – 11/11/18 – all same as attempt #2, expect for yeast – we used WLP002 English Ale… OG 1.052 / started the mash schedule at 138F and slowly ramped to 152F in 1 hour, then held at 152F for an additional 30 minutes for 90 minute total mash / this mash schedule produced much a better efficiency compared to OG of 1.040 in attempt #2

Beer tastes awesome – Fermentation was 2 weeks, which included 1 week rest time – this helps the yeast to reabsorb any unwanted off-flavors, in keg for only a few days!  Boom, a winner!